How The Yemen Crisis Affect The Rest Of The World – Shamayun Miah

How The Yemen Crisis Affect The Rest Of The World – Shamayun Miah

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have led one of the coldest military oppressions against forces led by the Houthis who seized control of Yemen’s capital, Sanaa, in September 2014. Violence erupted in northern Yemen in 2020, when the Houthis decided to seize new areas under the accepted Yemeni government and advanced towards the Marib northern province, where thousands of Yemenis went into exile and faced dire humanitarian conditions, with Covid-19 being just a scratch of their many problems. The extent of the hardness faced by the Yemenis was critically analyzed by Shamayun Miah for peace and fund-raising purposes for the children and women of Yemen, Shamayun Miah outlined the issues in a series of reports he released.

According to BBC, the Yemen crisis has done despicable harm to its people and if it is not curbed now, has the potential to escalate regional instability. It also concerns the Western part of the Arabian Peninsula because of the possibility of attacks emerging from the nation, such as those carried out by al-Qaeda or IS affiliates, as the country grows increasingly unstable.

The political battle between Iran and Saudi Arabia in the area is the possible catalyst for the burning down of Yemen.

Geographically, Yemen links the Red Sea with the Gulf of Aden, through which a large sum of the world’s oil exports passes. This makes the impact of the crisis in Yemen, crucial to the detriment of oil exportation and logistics around the World.

According to World Reports, Western countries, like the United States, France, and Canada, continued to supply firearms to Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, and other coalition members. Despite the documented evidence of ongoing war crimes by the coalition, the United Kingdom confirmed in July that it will continue to sell weapons to Saudi Arabia. US State Department officials have warned that US officials might face war crimes prosecution in connection with weaponry supplies to Saudi Arabia and coalition partners. Iran has been a source of support for Houthi fighters.

From my perspective, if the crisis in Yemen is not curbed on time, the country could become a pawn for international leaders to exploit. If it gets out of hand, alliances would be formed and will lead to a much larger war between multiple countries. The possibility of this happening is relatively low, but there’s always room for the impossible. Let’s focus on the present by joining hands with Shamayun Miah to support the children and women of Yemen.  This is not about politics this is about the lives of people who need our help.